A Thousand Themes, Maybe

It’s funny… the title of Jonathan Dee’s book, A Thousand Pardons, did not register with me at all. I did not look at the synopsis of the book before I started reading. It was only until after that I realized that the theme of the book was supposed to forgiveness. In my day (that would …

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In Winter

Secrets are laid bare Houses stand naked and exposed The road seems long and stark Nothing but pavement as far as the eye can see The shadow of bare limbs hovering Quivering naked and cold in the early morning light frost turns lawns and cars cloudy and white It is only November The months lay …

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Plan to Fail

I’ve written before about my reluctance to face other people’s realities. I do this by not watching the news, skipping over articles in the paper, scrolling past news stories on Facebook. I mean, it’s not like I don’t know. And it’s not like knowing more is going to suddenly spur me to action. Actually, that’s …

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Drafty

Winter has made its way to our corner of the NorthEast, early as it is. Let’s call it Snovember. In an old cottage like ours, cold drafts manage to sneak in under the front door. My husband’s been using one of the kid’s blankets as a draft snake, and that just won’t do. So, I …

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Without Power

I really want to write something here and I had some ideas but I didn’t write them down. Tsk. Here are some photos instead, of how we spent our week escaping from our powerless home.  Children’s Museum of Saratoga Booty My Spider-Man and CareBear Sol LeWitt at MASS MoCA Leaf printing at MASS MoCA Baby …

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Legend.

There were many, many fascinating details I learned about France, Europe and the development of race as a social construct in Tom Reiss’ new book, The Black Count but I really got hooked on the idea of Alex Dumas as a legend in his own time, even before his son, Alexandre Dumas, used him as the …

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Luckier.

I’d seen mention of Half The Sky on Twitter, but only had a vague recognition of what it was. Something to do with women or education or something? I’m not even sure if I follow Nicholas Kristof on Twitter. The other night, scrolling through the cable guide, I saw the listing for Half The Sky, …

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A Believer.

Having lived in Prague and travelled around the area quite a bit, I felt a special connection to The Bloodletter’s Daughter, a historical novel by Linda Lafferty that uses the legend of  Don Julius,  the mad bastard son of Emperor Rudolph II as the backdrop to the story of a young woman sold out by …

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